In today’s world of abundant information available
through portals such as the internet, it’s easy to imagine how people could
become desensitised and unmoved by, or overwhelmed and disconnected from data
about social, political and environmental issues. Considering this current
climate of surplus information, is it possible that society needs Art to be the
catalyst of change, more than it ever has been before? Throughout history, art
has been a voice in social and political movements against oppression and
injustice, challenging traditions and those in power. For example, Dadaism was
a response to the horrendous events of the First World War, Picasso’s Guernica (1937),
which captured the atrocities of the Spanish Civil War, became an inspiration
for the modern human rights movement and Judy Chicago explored women’s position
in culture and history with large scale collaborative installations and was one
of the founding members of the Feminist Art Movement.