Undoubtedly,
the most important reason of urban growth is increase in urban population.
Rapid growth of urban areas is the result either of natural increase in
population, and/ or migration to urban areas. Natural population growth is a
result of excessive births over deaths. On the one hand, migration can be
defined as the long-term relocation of an individual, household or group to a
new location outside the community of origin.* As Britain progressed from being
just a centre of “worldwide commerce” to embrace a “centre of manufacturing
industry”, the progress of the textile industry and the utilisation of steam
power meant that employment was to be found in central locations and thus people gathered in
factories. Since Britain’s dramatic population growth in
this period was at the same century that the first industrial revolution occurred,
the two are tied closely together. However, it is believed that migration from
the countryside was not the main factor. The growth didn’t occur from the
inflow of people seeking for work but instead it was mainly caused by internal
factors, such as changes in marriage patterns, improvements in health allowing
higher proportion of people to get married and subsequently have more babies.

Peter
Mathias in an attempt to find out how and why numbers rose he points out that
after mid 18th century fertility had twice the effect of falling
mortality. The average age of marriage fell, the rate of marriage rose, which
meant that there were more children per marriage as birth rates rose. British
people used to get married at older ages or never did at but during industrial
revolution the proportion of people never marrying fell from 15% to 7%.
Nuptuality, overall health improvements and a better diet from improved food
production and higher wages resulted in better health of mothers and the
curtailment of deaths of women in the reproductive age groups induced higher
birth rates. Economical and social conditions influenced marriage patterns. The
expansion of employment in manufacturing and trading regions offered higher
wages, allowing people to comfortably start families, and as they moved to the
industrial centres, they were likely to meet more, and that increased the
chances of matches, and settling down. *

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Peter
Mathias in an attempt to find out how and why numbers rose he points out that
after mid 18th century fertility had twice the effect of falling
mortality. The average age of marriage fell, the rate of marriage rose, which
meant that there were more children per marriage as birth rates rose. British
people used to get married at older ages or never did at but during industrial
revolution the proportion of people never marrying fell from 15% to 7%.
Nuptuality, overall health improvements and a better diet from improved food
production and higher wages resulted in better health of mothers and the
curtailment of deaths of women in the reproductive age groups induced higher
birth rates. Economical and social conditions influenced marriage patterns. The
expansion of employment in manufacturing and trading regions offered higher
wages, allowing people to comfortably start families, and as they moved to the
industrial centres, they were likely to meet more, and that increased the
chances of matches, and settling down. *

x

Hi!
I'm Joan!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out